The Power—or Threat—of Vertical Integration in Healthcare

Posted by Jacob Golbitz on Apr 10, 2018 5:24:25 PM

How CVS Health’s Performance Based Pharmacy Network Demonstrates its Competitive Strategy

In March 2018, CVS Health has introduced a ‘performance based pharmacy network,’ comprised of 30,000 CVS and Walgreens and approximately 10,000 other retail pharmacies nationwide. Mirroring the value-based model to incentivize pharmacies to help patients adhere to prescription regimens, the new network has the potential to control costs and improve the quality of care through increased access and convenience. In addition to addressing some of healthcare’s most pressing challenges, CVS Heath’s activities highlight how vertical integration is securing its market position and demonstrates how this strategy could be threatening to payers.

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Topics: New Market Entry, Healthcare, Merger and Acquisition, Insurers

How CVS Health’s Performance-Based Pharmacy is Positioned to Improve Cost and Quality across the Healthcare Continuum

Posted by Jacob Golbitz on Apr 6, 2018 12:23:26 PM

CVS Health issued a press release in October 2017 announcing the launch of the nation’s first “performance-based pharmacy network” in March 2018. The network will comprise approximately 30,000 retail pharmacies that currently work with Caremark, CVS Health’s Pharmacy Benefits Manager (PBM). Most of these stores will be CVS or Walgreens locations, but the network will also include up to 10,000 independently owned pharmacies.

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Topics: New Market Entry, Healthcare, Competitive Strategy, Diversification, Insurers

How Distributors Can Navigate the Fragmentation of Vaccine Administration

Posted by Laura Ruth on Apr 3, 2018 9:15:08 AM

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Topics: Market Analysis, New Market Entry, Healthcare, Life Sciences, Competitive Strategy, new entrants

Walmart’s Potential Acquisition of Humana: Competitive Strategy Implications for the U.S. Healthcare Industry

Posted by Ken Sawka on Mar 30, 2018 1:28:34 PM

 

I loathe the pervasive, trite metaphor that compares competitive strategy to the game of chess.  However, recent reports that Walmart is in discussions to acquire health insurer Humana can only be explained as a game of three-dimensional chess.  Should this deal go through – and, to be sure, it is a long way from happening – it satisfies three competitive strategy objectives for Walmart: responding to CVS Health, blocking Amazon and improving access to new customer segments.

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Topics: Competitive Intelligence, Healthcare, Merger and Acquisition, Competitive Strategy

Key Takeaways from the Institute of Directors Open House, 12-14 March 2018, London

Posted by Ken Sawka on Mar 27, 2018 6:24:18 PM

The Institute of Directors (IoD), founded in 1903 and awarded a Royal Charter in 1906 is an organization that supports and advocates for businesses and their leaders in the United Kingdom. The IoD serves its members by promoting free enterprise, actively lobbying to the government and helping set standards for corporate governance. Fuld + Company became a member of the IoD this year and were pleased to attend this year’s Open House, held from 12-14 March 2018 at the IoD’s stately headquarters just steps from Buckingham Palace.

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Topics: Competitive Strategy, Conferences

The Undeniable Rise of Challenger Banks in the United Kingdom: What Should the Big Four Do?

Posted by Ken Sawka on Mar 14, 2018 8:03:21 AM

 

How to evaluate, plan and execute a competitive counter-strategy against swift new entrants.

To say that the UK banking industry has weathered significant turmoil since the 2008-2009 financial crisis would be a gross understatement.  After  ten years marked by government bailouts, a string of annual losses, and customer defections, the big four UK banks – Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds Banking Group and Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS) – are just now starting to re-gain their footing.  All four banks last year reported increases in operating profits, with RBS realizing its first full year attributable profit in ten years.  Most of the big four – with the notable exception of RBS – have returned to private ownership or are close to doing so, having emerged from under the government bailouts provided in the wake of the financial crisis.  Capital ratios are stronger, and customer defections seem to be stabilizing.

However, a confluence of trends, including liberalized regulatory policies, the rapid emergence of digital innovation from FinTech companies, and shifting consumer preferences, has accelerated a competitive risk over the past several years – the rise of challenger banks in the UK.  Challenger banks – also known as “neo-banks” – are small, newly formed retail banks that compete with the Big Four, often by specializing in areas underserved by the those larger, established firms. These upstarts distinguish themselves from the traditional banks by deploying cutting edge information technology practices, such as on-line only operations, that avoid the costs and complexities of traditional banking. And, these technology innovations not only serve to keep costs in check, they also appeal to the increasingly tech-enabled and mobile segments of younger consumers, who liken banking at a high street financial services institution to using a dial up modem to access the internet. 

New Entrants Competing in the Banking Space

According to a review earlier this year of challenger banks by Banking Technology, there are some 76 viable alternatives to the traditional high street banks currently operating, or planning to commence operations this year, in the UK.  To be sure, many of these are extremely limited in scope – Coconut, for example, which launched in January 2018, is a “banking service” targeted at freelancers rather than a full-fledged bank – but many offer virtually all the consumer banking services of a walk-in RBS or Barclays branch anywhere in London.

At the heart of the proliferation of challenger banks is a loosening of regulations that favors the upstarts.  According to the Financial Times, the Bank of England has promised to change the capital requirements for challenger banks so that they can offer a more competitive mortgage service.  Furthermore, the Second Payments Services Directive (PSD2) this year requires banks to open their payments infrastructure and customer data assets to third parties that can then develop payments and information services for customers, according to an analysis of the new regulations by audit, tax and consulting firm PwC.  The new regulation aims to level the playing field for all payments providers while ensuring enhanced security and stronger consumer protections.

And, they are well funded and well managed.  Many challenger banks have incredibly innovative talent behind them, mostly from outside the financial services sector, according to an article in the Financial Times.  Challenger bank founders include American entrepreneur and venture capitalist Eileen Burbidge, Indian steel magnate Sanjeev Gupta, and the billionaire Pears family, one of the largest and most private landlords in London and the Southeast. To assume that these upstart competitors are fly-by-night, shoestring operations would be a grave mistake.

Understanding and Responding to the Threat

What then, should the large established banks, or any incumbent financial services company threatened by these new entrants, do? The first step is to acknowledge that the knee-jerk counter-competitive responses that established banks may have deployed against each other probably will not work against this new breed of competitors. Why?

  1. Profit expectations are undoubtedly different for the challenger banks. Profits that would disappoint the established banks may be a boon to the new guys, especially as many FinTech organizations suffer multiple quarterly losses before turning their first profit. Don’t expect profitability to be a core objective of the challenger banks, at least in the short run, and don’t assume that poor financial performance makes these upstarts any less of a competitive threat.
  2. Challenger banks’ understanding of consumer preferences. Especially among young and tech-savvy consumers who may be opening their first bank account, service expectations are more sophisticated. Having lived through the financial crisis as children and now entering their professional lives, these consumers are not easily drawn to teaser interest rates. These are financially weary, risk-averse individuals for whom rapid accumulation of capital is not a primary driver of happiness.
  3. Trying to compete with challenger banks on their own terms may not be feasible. While large banks may be compelled to launch their own challenger brands, they are likely to be burdened by inflexible legacy infrastructure and an adherence to old business models.  Collaboration and partnerships with the FinTechs may be a better course of action than direct competition.

Establishing a Competitive Strategy

A better approach undoubtedly is to take a measured and disciplined route to developing a unique competitive strategy that is intended especially for the challenger banks.  The first step is to simply get smart about the new rivals.  Basic intelligence gathering and analysis that can uncover challenger banks’ strategic intentions, goals and objectives, and basic assumptions about the market is critical.  Remember, to assume that these competitors are operating to achieve the same goals and objectives of established banks—or even of each other—is a mistake. Any established firm being challenged by a new entrant cannot hope to compete without in-depth knowledge of the intentions and capabilities of the new competitor.

Stress-Testing Your Strategy

With facts about the new competitors in hand, the next step is to stress-test your current business strategy to ensure it is resilient against the challenge posed by the new group of competitors.  This stress test should encompass two critical aspects of strategy:

  • The first is to test for differentiation. At the very essence of strategy is the notion of differentiation.  Strategy, according to Michael Porter, is performing different activities from your rivals or performing similar activities in different ways.  Established banks should determine whether their strategy fits either of these two requirements when considered against the challenger banks’ intentions and capabilities.
  • The second is for the established banks to re-examine their market segmentation. Not every challenger bank is going to appeal to every segment of the market; counter-competitive strategy to take on the challenger banks should focus on 1) identifying and protecting those segments that may be at risk from the challenger banks, and 2) identifying those segments that challenger banks are unlikely to target, and avoiding any shifts in strategy that could weaken the established banks’ appeal to these segments.

Prioritizing and Devising a Counter-Strategy

After re-examining differentiation and segmentation strategies, the incumbent banks should then be able to prioritize where the threat from the challenger banks is most severe and explore different strategic options to counter the threat.  In this situation, tools like scenario analysis and competitive war-gaming can help generate strategic options that have been tested against various market conditions and forces in ways that facilitate internal alignment and a sense of urgency to act.  It’s always better to test and rehearse strategic options in a safe and controlled environment rather than deploying them in competitive markets blindly.

 

Just when the large and established UK banks are solidifying their footing ten years after the global financial crisis, a batch of start-ups, taking advantage of rapid technological advances, lower cost structure, and loosening regulations, is posing new challenges. Established banks must first acknowledge that competitive response to the challenger banks requires new ways of thinking about the competition, and then take a measured and disciplined approach to developing and deploying a targeted and workable counter competitive strategy.

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Topics: Financial Services, Market Analysis, New Market Entry, Banking

An Uphill Battle for Biosimilar Adoption in the U.S.

Posted by Varun Naik on Feb 26, 2018 6:00:23 PM

Biosimilars were expected to spark competition and lower prices for branded biologics, but this potential has still been unfulfilled. The U.S. health industry has been relatively slow to adopt biosimilars due to a combination of complex market access tactics employed by branded biologics manufacturers, on-going patent litigation, lack of interchangeability, and a general lack of awareness and acceptance of biosimilars. To date, the FDA has approved nine biosimilars; however, only three biosimilars have launched. The current biosimilars landscape is in stark contrast to the generics market where payers and pharmacy benefit managers promote these cheaper alternatives to reduce healthcare costs.

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Topics: Market Analysis, Pharma, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals

Supply Chain Shifts in the Ever-Tumultuous Health Industry

Posted by Robert Flynn on Jan 19, 2018 3:33:19 PM

Capitalism has its flaws. Economists as diverse as Adam Smith to Karl Marx would agree to this premise. Yet one strength that capitalism brings to bear in the marketplace is efficiency, particularly the ability to identify and capture substitute products and services when supply and demand constrains efficient market activity. Nowhere is this dynamic more apparent than in the seemingly ever-tumultuous health industry.

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Topics: Competitive Intelligence, Pharma, Scenario Analysis, Competitive Strategy, Robert Flynn, Pharmaceuticals

The Rideshare Opportunity in Kenya and Across Sub-Saharan Africa

Posted by Ben Price on Jan 16, 2018 4:04:51 PM

Nairobi, Kenya, the hub of East Africa, is a bustling city marked by contradictions – for example, it houses a combination of highly developed corporate high-rise offices and traditional African trade markets consisting of temporary kiosks and relatively permanent dukas. A more tangible contradiction is in transportation. A recent boom in automobile sales has plagued the city with horrendous traffic due to poor road infrastructure. Yet for those many who cannot afford to own a vehicle, transportation comes in the form of taxis, mutatus (buses), and Uber.

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Topics: Competitive Intelligence, Product Roadmap, Brand Insights, Scenario Analysis, Competitive Strategy, Early Warning

What are the Competitive Strategy Implications of Uber's European Regulatory Woes?

Posted by Ken Sawka on Jan 10, 2018 10:44:04 PM

Let me be clear right from the start – I loathe Uber. While I’m a big fan of ride-hailing services, I simply can’t give my business to a company that harasses its employees, whose CEO berates its drivers, uses questionable means to skirt regulation, and allegedly steals trade secrets from its competitors. I’m a Lyft guy through and through.

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Topics: Brand Insights, Industry Convergence, Merger and Acquisition, Competitive Strategy, Early Warning

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